Richard “Dick” Raby story

The family of Dick Raby have published his story. The e-reader version is available on Amazon.com and BN.com....
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Debrief of Joseph Spano

This debrief is posted with the permission of Mr. Spano’s family. JoeSpano_Affidavit3.18.1954
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Colonel John J. Dunn

For a long time now an attempt to cause the MOH to be awarded to Colonel John J. Dunn has been undertaken by relatives and some of the Tiger Survivors.  This project has taken a large step in the past few days and the paperwork is on its way to Washington. Colonel Dunn, then a Major, was captured after being shot two times in the jaw and face area.  Despite his wounds he took over command of the group from the 24th Infantry Division (mostly).  Such action would normally mean death at some point.  The North Koreans were killing a lot of POWs in those days.  ( Much like today except they are killing their own people) This group of POWs came to be known as the Tiger Survivors. 58 % perished in captivity.  81 multi national civilians were with us as well. All through this terrible ordeal Major Dunn was held responsible for the entire group.  He organized the group into sections as allowed by the North Korans.  This  was an important part of our survival.  Many many other things happened along the way as you can well imagine. The most outstanding incident regarding Major Dunn was when some Chinese and Russian Army officers came to our camp in the spring of 1951.  They had a meeting with Major Dunn and Captain Boysen (Medical Doctor).  Ironically the Tiger was not invited.  Apparently news of the Tiger atrocities had reached the outside world and these Russians and Chinese officers were investigating this. (in my humble opinion). During this meeting ( remember 220 of us had died the previous winter at Hanjang-nee including an American Bishop Patrick Byrne), Major Dunn took a chance thinking he could stop the killings and deaths among our group, and told them about the activities of the Tiger.  Major Dunn actually thought this would cause his death but instead the Tiger was actually relieved of his command and departed with all the NK guards and officers who were considered the bad ones.  In the fall of 1951 we were turned over to the Chinese Army POW camps at Chang Song North Korea.  The officers were taken to the officers camp.  Only 10 more of us died under Chinese control and the cause of death was brought with them from the Koreans. Major Dunn was a tough man and used to box bare knuckle to get...
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Alfred Charles Bordeau

The information on this page was provided by Duff Zube, Alfred C. Bordeau was his mother’s oldest brother. Bordeau was killed in a POW camp on June 30, 1951 almost to a year of being a POW. webmaster note: Alfred Bordeau was a Tiger. If you knew Alfred, please email...
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Charles B. Elder to receive Purple Heart 65 years after being wounded in Korea

  http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/bs-md-co-purple-heart-20150622-story.html   OPEN INVITATION Local Veteran to receive Purple Heart 65 years after being wounded in Korea. Celebrate this amazing event at the Jacksonville Senior Center, Sweet Air Road Phoenix, MD, June 22, 2015 at 1:00 PM . Award will be made by Rear Admiral Dale Horan. Charles B. Elder Born July 27,1927 I was raised on the Elder Farm on Hydes Road, Baltimore County, Maryland. The farm was apples, peaches and poultry. Education: Attended a 2 room school on Manor Road until Carroll Manor School opened in 1935. Started in 3rd grade and went to Towson High School in 1941 and graduated in 1945. Attended Baltimore Engineering Institute for 3 years obtaining a certificate. Hopkins McCoy College 1947 to 1948. Worked at home on farm. Enlisted in 1949 at the Towson Armory. Inducted into the service at Fort Meade. Completed basic training at Camp Picket, VA. After a 30 day leave I had to report to Fort Ord, CA. for deployment overseas. My records were lost so I was sent to Camp Stoneman, CA for a second basic training. In late 1950 returned to San Francisco, CA for shipment to Japan. We arrived in Southern Japan in the town of Sasebo. Went by boat to Pusan in southern Korea. Transported by train to front lines in April. Captured by North Koreans on Heartbreak Ridge, North of the 38th Parallel. I was wounded the day I was captured. I walked for a while until unable to walk any further. I was put on an ox cart as we zig zag back and forth across Korea to the prison camp. We marched for 25-30 days before reaching the prison camp. Operated on by North Koreans on the march in hut using kitchen utensils and holding down my arms and legs with no anesthetic. There were 8 to 10 on single ox cart during March. I was the only one to survive March to the prison camp. Chic Chikami who lives in Winter Park, Florida was my platoon leader said I smelled horrible, my hip was full of infection and maggots. To pass the time I was forced to attend propaganda classes. Able ones were sent on wood detail, carrying wood for the Chinese to keep warm. We were turned over to the Chinese when we got to prison camp. It was cold in winter – 40 to 50 below...
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Reactionaries

Dad (Franklin Jack Chapman) has always talked about how they were considered “Reactionaries” in camp. I asked Dad to write down some of the things they had done to be called “reactionary”. Here are his remembrances. – Cindy Chapman I was captured on November 30th, 1950. I finally arrived at Camp One where I met Dick Raby, Dick Rook and several others. It was late 1951 when I arrived at Camp One, Company 7. Dick Raby was already there. During early spring 1952, several of us formed an organization that called itself the “True Americans” better known to the Chinese as the “Reactionaries”. We made plans for escapes and organized other resistances. One of our protests was to refuse to stand in the freezing cold and be forced to listen to the Communists and their damn lectures. One cold morning, right after we were called out for roll call, several of us broke ranks and ran back to our huts and we refused to return to the formation. This action caused many of our inmates to break ranks and run to their huts. In April 1952, we were informed by the Chinese that we would be marching in a May Day parade that was to travel through the center of town (Chang Song). Our group passed the word around to those we could trust and told them not to march in the parade and everyone agreed. I recall, it was some time around May 1952, when the Chinese finally gave us new clothing. Around May or June, they said we were going to march in the May 1, 1952 May Day parade, the Chinese Herded us onto the main road for the parade. We were all dressed in our new Dress Blues that the Chinese had issued a short time before. When they saw what we had done (painted POW across the back of the jacket/shirts – this was Luis Lugo’s idea), they became extremely upset and began lecturing us about the destruction of the clothing. (note from Cindy: they used berries to paint POW on the back of their shirts, and wore their jackets over the shirts. When they got in line and started marching, they took the jackets off.) There were several other incidents which took place in Company Seven and Company Four. One was helping to break a fellow out of confinement. Here’s what Dick Raby...
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