Johnson’s List

There is a complete listing of the entries that could be recovered from Johnson’s List at the DPAA website.
read more

Oldest Living Tiger Survivor

Wayman Simpson is now the oldest living Tiger Survivor and will be 94 on April 26. During WW11 Wayman was assigned to a British artillery unit in Africa and saw action with that unit. He was stationed in Japan with B Battery of the 63rd Field Artillery Battalion of the 24th Infantry Division and was attached to L Company of the 34th Regiment as a FO.  He was captured on 14 July 1950 and released on 30 August 1953. Shorty the Tiger webmaster’s note: Wayman Simpson passed away on October 12,...
read more

Johnson’s List

Wayne Archer “Johnnie” Johnson, L Company, 21st Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, U. S. Army, was captured on July 11, 1950. Johnson became part of the Tiger Survivors group and was held for nearly 38 months by the North Koreans and then by the Chinese Army. He was from Lima, Ohio. Johnson started keeping a record of the men so that the families back home would know what happened to their loved ones. The fact that he could have been punished or even shot for keeping such a list did not stop him. Along the way, buddies would tell him about someone dying and others would stand guard while Johnson recorded the deaths. When Johnson was released in August 1953, he told the authorities on the ship about his list and the debriefing officer noted it in his file. But, nothing was done about it until 1994 when Johnson announced to several of his buddies that he still had the list. Wilbert R. “Shorty” Estabrook, B Company, 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, U. S. Army, founded the Tiger Survivors in 1970. He was working on rosters of the living and dead and Johnson’s list brought the Tiger Survivors roster to completion. Estabrook was captured on 16 July 1950. Command Sergeant Major Timothy F. Casey, Retired U. S. Army, was also interested in POW affairs of the Korean War, though he was not a POW himself. It was Casey who brought Johnson’s list to the attention of the authorities. Casey soon became an unpaid analyst for the Tiger Survivors group and is considered by many to be an expert on Korean War POWs. With Johnson’s list and other information, Estabrook and Casey began the long process of reconstructing Tiger Survivors records which now include complete information as you see it. Because of Johnson’s efforts in keeping his secret list, he was awarded the Silver Star Medal at a reunion of the Korean War Ex-POWs. Due to the efforts of many, the complete Tiger Survivors roster is now on the internet. Every Tiger Survivor is accounted...
read more

Lady Tigers

By Shorty Estabrook Beginning on 29 June, 1950, there were 23 women arrested in South Korea by the advancing North Korean Army. These women, along with 58 civilian men, were held with American Prisoners of War who were mostly from the 24th Infantry Division, the first Americans to fight in the Korean War. These 23 women are now known as Lady Tigers. Being a Prisoner of War is a terrifying experience for a soldier who never knew when death would end his imprisonment. What was such an experience for a Lady?  I think they suffered more than the men did.  They were forced to march like the men, endure the freezing cold, sleep out in frozen fields with little cover, endure beatings and malnutrition and suffer the lice and other illnesses — just like the men.  No special privilege was afforded to these brave ladies. Two of them had children with them they had to care for.   Little privacy was available for them and they had to deal with the natural things related to a female.  Despite all this many survived this terrible ordeal. As of this writing perhaps two still survive.  This is a testament of true grit. Let me now introduce you to these LADY TIGERS. Theresa Bastin, a Carmelite Nun from Viton, Belgium, was born in 1901 and was 49 when arrested in July 1950 and perished 30 November 1950 at Hanjang-ni North Korea. When World War 1 broke out she was just 13 when the Germans invaded Belgium in 1914. She became a member of “La Dame Blanche” a secret underground group. Several members were executed by the Germans and she was arrested in 1918 but released for lack of evidence. She made socks for others as a prisoner in North Korea but her health kept declining and she knew her end was near.  She was with the Carmelite Convent in Seoul when arrested. She is included in a military museum in Belgium. Mary Clare, an Anglican Nun from County Wicklow, Ireland, was born in 1883 and was 67 when arrested on 2 July 1950. She was shot to death on 6 November 1950 on the Tiger Death March. Henriette de L’Obit a French Carmelite Nun was arrested 15 July 1950 and released on 26 March 1953. She was with the Carmelite Convent and Sisters of St. Paul de Chartres Orphanage in Seoul, South Korea. Eugenie Demeusy (Yvonne), France, was with the Carmelite Convent and Sisters...
read more