Recoveries


The information in these pages has been compiled from press releases distributed by DPAA.


Brown, Cpl Ben L.

Posted by on May 13, 2015 in Recoveries | 1 comment

Brown, Cpl Ben L.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. soldier, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Cpl. Ben L. Brown, 17, of Four Mile, Ore., will be buried May 15, in Roseburg, Ore. In early 1951, Brown was assigned to Company I, 3rd Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division (ID), which was occupying positions in the vicinity of Hoengsong, South Korea, when their defensive line was attacked by Chinese forces. This attack forced the unit to withdraw south to a more defensible position. After the battle, Brown was reported missing in action. A military review board later reviewed the loss of Brown, declaring him dead and his remains non-recoverable. Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over with some of the boxes, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where POWs from Brown’s unit were believed to have died. To identify Brown’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence, dental comparison, which matched his records, and two forms of forensic identification tools, to include mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched his sister and brother, and Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat (Y-STR) DNA, which matched his brother. Today, 7,852 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American recovery teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for missing Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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Erickson, Pfc Eugene L.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 3 comments

Erickson, Pfc Eugene L.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Pfc. Eugene L. Erickson, 21, of Brainerd, Minn., will be buried May 13, in Santa Fe, N.M. In mid May 1951, Erickson and elements of Company B, 1st Battalion, 38th Infantry Regiment (IR), 2nd Infantry Division (ID), were engaged against enemy forces north of Hougchon, South Korea, when their unit was overwhelmed by Chinese forces. This attack caused the 38th IR to withdraw south to a more defensible position. Erickson was reported missing after the attack. In September 1953, as part of a prisoner of war exchange known as Operation Big Switch, returning American soldiers who had been held as prisoners of war, reported that Erickson had been captured by Chinese forces. Reports indicated he died in the summer of 1951 from dysentery and malnutrition, while held in a prisoner of war camp in Suan, North Korea. A military review board later amended Erickson’s status to deceased. Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over at that time, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Erickson was believed to have died. In the identification of Erickson’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including two forms of DNA analysis, mitochondrial DNA, which matched his brother and niece, and Y-Chromosome Short Tandem Repeat (Y-STR) DNA, which matched his brother. Today, 7,852 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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Richard, Cpl Elmer P.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 1 comment

Richard, Cpl Elmer P.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Pfc. Elmer P. Richard, 20, of Exeter, N.H., will be buried June 3, in his hometown. In late November 1950, Richard was a member of Battery D, 15th Antiaircraft Artillery Automatic Weapons Battalion, 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT), operating along the eastern side of the Chosin Reservoir, in North Korea. On Nov. 29, 1950, elements of the 31st RCT, historically known as Task Force Faith, were overwhelmed by Chinese People’s Volunteer forces which forced the 31st RCT to withdraw south to more defensible positions. On Dec. 2, 1950, Richard was reported missing in action. In late 1953, during a prisoner of war exchange, known as Operation Big Switch, a returned U.S. service member told U.S. debriefers that Richard was captured by Chinese forces and to have died in mid-December 1950, from battle wounds and dysentery. His remains were not among those returned by communist forces during Operation Glory in 1954. Between 1990 and 1994, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over at that time, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Richard was believed to have died. On Oct. 5, 2000, a joint U.S./Democratic People’s Republic Korea (D.P.R.K.) team excavated a secondary burial site where U.S. servicemen were believed to have been buried after the Korean War. The team recovered commingled human remains. To identify Richard’s remains, scientists from the DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and two forms of DNA analysis including; mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat DNA (Y-STR) analysis, which matched his brothers. Today, 7,852 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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McLaughlin, Sgt John

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 0 comments

Sgt. John McLaughlin, U.S. Marine Corps, Company D, 32nd Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, 1st Marine Division, Lost: 12/2/1950, Location: North Korea; Identified: 4/8/2015

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Darden, Pfc Kenneth P.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 2 comments

Pfc. Kenneth P. Darden, U.S. Army, Battery A, 15th Field Artillery, 2nd Infantry Division; Lost: 2/13/1951, Location: North Korea; Identified: 3/23/2015

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Dawson, Sgt, Wallace J.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 0 comments

Dawson, Sgt, Wallace J.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Sgt. Wallace J. Dawson, 21, of Santa Barbara, Calif., will be buried May 1, in his hometown. In early February 1951, Dawson and elements of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment (IR), 2nd Infantry Division (ID), were occupying a position in the vicinity of Sang-sok, South Korea, when their unit was overwhelmed by Chinese forces. This attack caused the unit to withdraw south to a more defensible position. Dawson was reported missing Feb. 14, 1951. In 1953, during Operation Big Switch, returning American prisoners reported that Dawson was captured by enemy forces and died in June 1951 from malnutrition. He was reported to have been buried at prisoner of war Camp 1, in Changsong. In 1954, during Operation Glory, United Nations and Communist Forces exchanged the remains of war dead. All remains recovered in Operation Glory were turned over to the Army Central Identification Unit in Kokura, Japan, for analysis. The unidentified remains were interred as unknowns at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Hawaii, known as the “Punchbowl.” In 2014, with advances in technology, the Department of Defense (DoD) laboratory in Hawaii, re-examined the records and concluded that the possibility of identification existed. In the identification of Dawson’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence, chest radiography and dental comparison, which matched his records. Today, 7,852 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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Jones, Pfc Lotchie J.R.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 0 comments

Jones, Pfc Lotchie J.R.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Pfc. Lotchie J.R. Jones, 18, of Jasper, Tenn., will be buried March 6, in Chattanooga, Tenn. In November 1950, Jones was a member of Company B, 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division. In 1953, reports from returning prisoners of war (POW) indicated that Jones was captured by enemy forces Nov. 2, 1950, and died in a prisoner of war camp, known as Camp 5, Feb. 28, 1951. From August 31 to Nov. 9, 1954, the United Nations and communist forces exchanged the war dead, commonly known as Operation Glory. As part of the exchange, communist forces turned over 25 boxes of remains that were believed to be American servicemen who were recovered near the vicinity where Jones was held as a POW. The remains were transferred to the U.S. Army’s Central Identification Unit (CIU) in Kokura, Japan for analysis. Out of the 25 boxes transferred to the CIU, 17 servicemen were identified; one box was believed to be that of a Korean national; and the last seven boxes of remains were unidentified. When all attempts to associate these remains to servicemen were unsuccessful, a military review board declared the remains to be unidentifiable and the remains were interred in the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific, commonly known as the Punchbowl. In 2014, with the advances of technology, the DoD laboratory, re-examined the records from the CIU and concluded that the possibility of identifying the remains now existed. The remains were exhumed and analyzed. To identify Jones’ remains, scientists from DPAA used circumstantial evidence, radiographs and dental comparison. Today, 7.855 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered from North Korea by American recovery teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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Bowers, PFC John R.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 0 comments

Bowers, PFC John R.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. soldier, unaccounted for from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Pfc. John R. Bowers, 18, of Piedmont S.C., will be buried March 21, in his hometown. On Feb. 11, 1951, Bowers was assigned to Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment (IR), 2nd Infantry Division (ID), which was engaged in a battle against enemy forces in the vicinity of Changbong-ni, Republic of South Korea. Enemy forces overwhelmed the 9th IR, and they were forced to withdraw to a more defensible position. On Feb. 14, 1951, Bowers was reported missing in action. On June 20, 1951, the Chinese reported that Bowers was captured and was held in the prisoner of war camp, known as Camp 5, near Pyokdong, North Korea. On Dec. 26, 1951, Chinese forces reported that Bowers died May 3, 1951, as a result of friendly fire. In late 1953, when no further information pertaining to Bowers was received during the prisoner of war exchange, known as “Operation Big Switch,” and his remains were not among those turned over to the U.S. by communist forces after the Armistice, a military review board amended his status to presumed dead. Between 1991 and 1994, the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (D.P.R.K) turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over at that time, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Bowers was believed to have died. To identify Bowers, scientists from the DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence, dental comparison, and forensic identification tools, to include two forms of DNA analysis: mitochondrial DNA analysis, which matched his sister and brother, and Y- chromosome Short Tandem Repeat (Y-STR) DNA analysis, which matched his brother. Today, 7,852 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American recovery...

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Andring, Sgt Arnold V.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 0 comments

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Sgt. Arnold V. Andring, 24, of Gary, Minn., will be buried April 25, in Mahnomen, Minn. In early February 1951, Andring and elements of Company L, 3rd Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment (IR), 2nd Infantry Division (ID), were occupying a position in the vicinity of Wonju, South Korea, when their unit was overwhelmed by Chinese forces. This attack caused the 9th IR to withdraw south to a more defensible position. Andring was reported missing after the attack. In September 1953, as part of a prisoner of war exchange, known as Operation Big Switch, returning American soldiers who had been held as prisoners of war reported that Andring had been captured by Chinese forces. Reports indicated he died from malnutrition in a prisoner of war camp in Suan, North Korea. A military board later amended Andring’s status to deceased. Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over at that time, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the vicinity where Andring was believed to have died. In the identification of Andring’s remains, scientists from DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and forensic identification tools, including two forms of DNA analysis, mitochondrial DNA, which matched his sister and brother, and Y-Chromosome Short Tandem Repeat (Y-STR) DNA, which matched his brother. Today, 7,852 Americans remain unaccounted-for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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Jackson, Sgt Floyd J.R.

Posted by on Apr 20, 2015 in Recoveries | 1 comment

Jackson, Sgt Floyd J.R.

The Department of Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) announced today that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing from the Korean War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial with full military honors. Army Sgt. Floyd J.R. Jackson, 20, of Warrensburg, Mo., will be buried March 7, in Littleton, Colo. In late November 1950, Jackson was assigned to Headquarters Company, 3rd Battalion, 31st Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, which made up part of the 31st Regimental Combat Team (RCT). The 31st RCT was deployed east of the Chosin Reservoir, North Korea, when it was attacked by overwhelming numbers of Chinese forces. On Nov. 29, 1950, remnants of the 31st RCT, known historically as Task Force Faith, began a fighting withdrawal to more defensible positions near Hagaru-ri, south of the reservoir. On Dec. 12, 1950, Jackson was reported as missing in action. In late 1953, during a prisoner of war exchange, known as Operation Big Switch, a returning U.S. service member told U.S. debriefers that Jackson was captured by Chinese forces Dec. 12, 1950, and had died Feb. 13, 1951, while in an enemy prisoner of war camp. His remains were not among those returned by communist forces during Operation Glory in 1954. Between 1991 and 1994, North Korea turned over to the U.S. 208 boxes of human remains believed to contain more than 400 U.S. servicemen who fought during the war. North Korean documents, turned over at that time, indicated that some of the remains were recovered from the area where Jackson was believed to have died. From 1990 – 2005, U.S. teams excavated sites in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (D.P.R.K.), where U.S. servicemen were believed to have been lost during the Korean War. In July 2000, a U.S. team excavated a burial site near Unsan, North Korea, recovering commingled human remains. To identify Jackson’s remains, scientists from the DPAA and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory (AFDIL) used circumstantial evidence and two forms of DNA identification tools; including mitochondrial DNA, which matched Jackson’s niece and grand-nephew, and Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat DNA (Y-STR) analysis, which matched his nephew. The results of the DNA analysis revealed that Jackson’s remains were among those turned over by North Korea and those excavated near Unsan. Today, 7,855 Americans remain unaccounted for from the Korean War. Using modern technology, identifications continue to be made from remains that were previously turned over by North Korean officials or recovered by American teams. For additional information on the Defense Department’s mission to account for Americans, who went missing while serving our country, visit the DPAA website at www.dpaa.mil or call (703)...

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